Pinoleville Pomo Nation News

 

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Indian Health Service (IHS) Office of Tribal Self-Governance (OTSG) determined the Pinoleville Pomo Nation satisfied and met all statutory eligibility criteria required to participate in the IHS Tribal Self-Governance Program…Read full letter

 

 

 

 

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Updated Newsletter

This is the latest news from the Pinoleville Pomo Nation Tribal Newsletter.  News from the tribe that is published on a bi-monthly basis.  Click here to view.

 

 

 

 

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Through the $18.2 million Native Youth Community Projects grants, community-led projects will help American Indian and Alaska native Students become college-and career-ready.  Each grant will support a coordinated, focused approach chosen by a community partnership that includes a tribe, local schools, and other organizations.  For example, the program allows tribes to identify culturally-appropriate, community-specific supports for college and career readiness—whether its early learning, language immersion or mental health services.  Watch the Presentation

 

 

 

Press-Release-SG-Cooperative-Agreements-1 IHS Awards $767,000 to Seven Tribes and Tribal Organizations for Self-Governance Planning and Negotiation Activities

The Indian Health Service has awarded 2016 Planning and Negotiation Cooperative Agreement awards to seven Tribes and Tribal Organizations.  These annual IHS cooperative agreement awards support tribal organizations with the planning and preparation necessary to assume responsibility for providing…read more

 

 

 

 

Elevations1The Pinoleville Pomo Nation is accepting  bids to construct a 3,600 sq. ft. Youth Wellness and Education Center, located on the Pinoleville Pomo Nation Reservation in Ukiah, Mendocino County, California. This project includes…read more

 

 

 

ehp_journalHealthier Tribal Housing: Combining the Best of Old and New

Nate Seltenrich | A460-A469

A convergence of housing-related factors may be partly to blame for increased disease risks among Native Americans and Alaska Natives, including poorly constructed homes, poverty, overcrowding, a lack of consideration of climate, insufficient indoor ventilation, and use of wood-burning stoves. But if housing is a problem, it may also be a solution. Tribes across the country are now building healthier homes that combine traditional indigenous building methods and designs with modern green building techniques.

 

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BUILDING MOMENTUM

Indian country is leading a green-building revolution that hoors its past and brightens its future.  This article is from Indian Country Today Media Network by Nat Seltenrich.  Click here to view this article.